Showing posts with label waterless. Show all posts
Showing posts with label waterless. Show all posts

Sunday, November 25, 2018

→ Embalming Methodology- Old School

For our purposes we are calling this embalming technique, "Old School".  For those embalmers who know it, the name is out of respect for those still using it.  With respect for the the veterans of the profession, some young embalmers have learned why this old trick should never be forgotten.

The method is simple really, this is one of my personal favorites for apparent difficult cases (cases you'd expect to raise more than one vessel). Make a selection of an artery.  Be sure NOT to rupture any vessels in the process. If one should break, take care to use a locking forcep to restrict drainage. Incise the artery and insert a cannula, my preference is to utilize a Director Cannula to obtain access to the aorta.  This is helpful to reduce the possibility of post embalming swelling.

Estimate the deceased total body weight and take note.  Begin to inject without drainage the total body weight in ounces (you most likely will not need to inject the entire solution). For this method to work well, your pressure setting must be high (at least greater than 20) and it is wise to heavily restrict your rate of flow (trickle treat folks).  Take notice of the superficial vessels as an indication of fluid distribution.  Continue injection so long as swelling does not occur and until adequate firmness is achieved.  Massage during and after injection and apply warm water over the deceased (this accelerates the firming effects, heat provides ATP for the RXN).  Adequate and thorough aspiration following injection is very important as this will serve as the only means to remove blood from the body.

For best results consider handling these cases with a higher index solution or even waterless. For waterless cases, consider using the Pressure Pump Injector. This hand pump permits high pressure injection with ease-one bottle at a time-with trigger control.

This high pressure style embalming method we call "Old School" more than makes up for its distribution limitations with exceptional diffusion (high to low-low to high concentration). Embalming text supports heavily drainage being overated, we won't agree entirely.  We acknowledge the importance of drainage to achieve a lifelike appearance.  With that being said "Old School" remains as a tried and tested approach every embalmer can count on. 

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

→ Waterless Embalming- Theory & Practical Application

Theory

Practical Applications Include: Decomposition / Edema / Trauma or Restoration Cases
Within the bounds of our topic, I must share the words of a great mentor who often said-
“ An embalmers ability is not well demonstrated or established with cases with little difficulty- it can be quantifiably measured by the progress made in times of trial and failure. ”
When or how might an embalmer make the determination to go waterless? The first step would be to judge not simply the case at hand, but also yourself. To be true and honest with the skills you possess is necessary to understand the limitations of your own capabilities. Second, how compromised is the case you are called to serve? A very clear indicator for me, as an embalmer, is the signs of marbling. Marbling is the apparent darkened discoloration of the superficial venous system. With this condition, one can reasonably expect the venous system in its decomposed state to have changed. Expect the expected- weaker vessel strength and decreased ability, or complete loss of the ability, to return blood or fluid (drainage).
Signs of decomposition should not be the only qualifier. For our purposes, we might also add cases of edema or restoration-that require rapid firmness. If we compare our most straightforward embalming cases with our more difficult cases, what can we learn? Would we agree that most straightforward cases required a lower chemical concentration and had significantly greater distribution to vessels as compared to the difficult cases. Having developed a case intuition or case analysis skill, the embalmer is provided the opportunity to adjust their method. Based upon the results presented- is it not reasonable to believe there might be a correlation between distribution and chemical concentration? If we accept these results and are honest with our limitations, we can grow. For as Jake Huard said, “To achieve we must believe”. If we continue to develop this belief, we might suggest that an increased chemical concentration can do well to compensate for poor distribution. When employed properly, results will show that this is true. Mastery of this skill requires a broad knowledge of the various difficult cases.
Edema is known to challenge even skilled embalmers. It is well known by expert embalmers, to adjust their fluid concentration to account for the added water. By estimating the volume of retained fluid- embalmers deduct this value from the water added to their fluid mixture. While the higher concentration of fluid enters the tissue- chemical concentration decreases. Though the concept is fairly straightforward, this is truly an art as much as a science.
In closing, trauma may be one of the greatest challenges an embalmer can face. Repairing tissue without first preservation could fail even the most skilled restorative artists. By experiencing the challenge of restoring poorly preserved tissue, restorative artists can learn to advantage their work with greater preservation.
-The Mortuary Scientist

Friday, November 2, 2018

→ New Video Ad- Pressure Pump Injector



Originally designed to revolutionize gravity feed cavity treatment-what was discovered was much more.  Undiluted pre-injections, hypodermics, high pressure power that puts machines to shame and even water-less cases-the pressure pump injector changes the game.  Screw on a standard 16 oz fluid bottle and get to work.  Intended for use with Tygon Tubing- 3/8 ID , 5/8 OD, 1/8 Wall.