Showing posts with label master. Show all posts
Showing posts with label master. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

→ Advanced Methodology- Embalming

Old is the song about embalming chemicals- the one about choosing and selecting the right chemicals for the case at hand. Please, don't misunderstand, I'm not suggesting this isn't important or that you shouldn't know chemicals. I am quite simply saying, it might just be time to change the record, at least for a bit ( Yes, record the thing people used to listen to before tapes or CD's ).

The Frederick & Strub embalming book maybe says this best.  Because mine isn't available at the moment, you will just have to take my paraphrasing for what it is. < begin poor paraphrasing > When the embalmer makes an adjustment according to the case, results will improve < end poor paraphrasing >. How many times recently have you made an adjustment based upon your case analysis? Of adjustments, did we re-think methodically or only chemically?

Considerations made of injection and drainage site per case, has often proven to be a great advantage in eliminating post mortem staining or achieving distribution to apparent problem areas. Less experienced embalmers may have a tendency to stick to what they know. I do not support or encourage this approach, especially "under development" as new embalmers often are. Alike, too often experienced embalmers approach similarly, as it's not broke let's not break it. I do not support or encourage this either, in fact learned embalmers should continue learning. Further, they should have worked hard enough to have established the foundation necessary to feel comfortable trying new things ( Remember, don't use a nail if the project calls for a screw- you just might have to go back and do it again! ). My advice to every embalmer, expect the expected. If you don't use your sense, you might pay for it in dollars later- in our case, doing a six pointer or worse, disappointing a family.

What new techniques or instruments have you come accross recently? Have they served you well in you efforts? For example, the bra-strap incision, at first this might be a real challenge for an embalmer.  If you were going to attempt it for the first time, I'd say to think autopsy case or even practice dissection on an autopsy case first. You might start by locating and raising the subclavian vessels and later realize you can also reach your carotid artery and jugular vein. As an evolved embalmer, going forward you may choose to make all your incisions this way. Where others will need more incisions in distribution failures, you won't. After subclavian successes you might begin to feel the emphasis of restricted cervical injection is exaggerated.

New instruments call new skill. Proficiency is achieved in practice. In practice knowledge is formed. Mastery requires all of oneself- it is achieved by developing all of ones skills, techniques, proficiencies and knowledge in practice to their fullest potential.