Showing posts with label science. Show all posts
Showing posts with label science. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

→ How the Embalming Machine Broke


Maybe your wondering how your machine broke-
Maybe you just wanted to learn more about your equipment-
Maybe your just curious about what we had to say-

Enjoy the show!

Sunday, December 16, 2018

→ Product Advertisement- Postmaster Line

Postmaster Line from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.

So you think you're a POSTMASTER?
Have you picked up-

The Postmaster's Squid -
https://www.mortuarymagic.com/embalmer-resources/product-claims/injection
Tapered "Y" splitters and medical clamps all in place and ready for the autopsy case. Control or inject all six vessels at once. Count on a squid to for uniform even distribution!
Order now →

Or

The Postmaster's Tee-Bone -
https://www.mortuarymagic.com/embalmer-resources/product-claims/aspiration
Aspiration "Tee" with a true no clog design. Thumb controlled aspiration. Designed to drop anything large, before an aspiration problem starts.
Order now →

What are you waiting for?
Take your autopsy case results from average, to awsome!

Friday, December 14, 2018

→ Product Advertisement- Hulk Aspirator


Aspiration Adapter
Really sucks-
Tough to clog-
Simple design-


The advantage of removing the backflow base from your aspirator is with this vacuum boost tubing all openings from trocar to exit increase in size.  This aids the embalming from ever having to take the time to reverse the flow and fix a clog. If used with reversibke flow all openings are still larger in size, if ever any issues arise maintenenance is simple. Two philips head screws, remove base, remove any buildup and debris.

Vacuum boost tubing is specific to whether you have your backflow base (reversible flow option) attached or not.

Order now →

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

→ Advanced Methodology- Embalming

Old is the song about embalming chemicals- the one about choosing and selecting the right chemicals for the case at hand. Please, don't misunderstand, I'm not suggesting this isn't important or that you shouldn't know chemicals. I am quite simply saying, it might just be time to change the record, at least for a bit ( Yes, record the thing people used to listen to before tapes or CD's ).

The Frederick & Strub embalming book maybe says this best.  Because mine isn't available at the moment, you will just have to take my paraphrasing for what it is. < begin poor paraphrasing > When the embalmer makes an adjustment according to the case, results will improve < end poor paraphrasing >. How many times recently have you made an adjustment based upon your case analysis? Of adjustments, did we re-think methodically or only chemically?

Considerations made of injection and drainage site per case, has often proven to be a great advantage in eliminating post mortem staining or achieving distribution to apparent problem areas. Less experienced embalmers may have a tendency to stick to what they know. I do not support or encourage this approach, especially "under development" as new embalmers often are. Alike, too often experienced embalmers approach similarly, as it's not broke let's not break it. I do not support or encourage this either, in fact learned embalmers should continue learning. Further, they should have worked hard enough to have established the foundation necessary to feel comfortable trying new things ( Remember, don't use a nail if the project calls for a screw- you just might have to go back and do it again! ). My advice to every embalmer, expect the expected. If you don't use your sense, you might pay for it in dollars later- in our case, doing a six pointer or worse, disappointing a family.

What new techniques or instruments have you come accross recently? Have they served you well in you efforts? For example, the bra-strap incision, at first this might be a real challenge for an embalmer.  If you were going to attempt it for the first time, I'd say to think autopsy case or even practice dissection on an autopsy case first. You might start by locating and raising the subclavian vessels and later realize you can also reach your carotid artery and jugular vein. As an evolved embalmer, going forward you may choose to make all your incisions this way. Where others will need more incisions in distribution failures, you won't. After subclavian successes you might begin to feel the emphasis of restricted cervical injection is exaggerated.

New instruments call new skill. Proficiency is achieved in practice. In practice knowledge is formed. Mastery requires all of oneself- it is achieved by developing all of ones skills, techniques, proficiencies and knowledge in practice to their fullest potential.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

→Chemical Diffusion and Embalming

Chemical Diffusion and Embalming from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.



This video is called Chemical Diffusion and Embalming
We are covering the basic rules of diffusion- a quick and easy video for understanding chemical diffusion and how it relates to embalming!
3 Minutes 39 Seconds-

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

→ Index- Chemical Science & Embalming

I'd prefer to start off mentioning one of my favorite books as a kid, Frog & Toad by Arnold Lobel.  Maybe you're already wondering what my mention has to do with embalming? Let's say I am trying to make up for the horrible things we are about to do a frog-in theory.

Imagine a bucket and fill it with 112 ounces of water.  Next, we shall add our favorite 30 Index arterial fluid (suppliers I will name your chemical here, just write me a check-first come first serve!)If we place these figures into our Original EmbalmCalc App the total solution index is 3.750%.

Now sadly for Mr. Frog(representing tissue of the body), when we place him in the bucket-he dies(call a trustworthy firm). Over time, our solution will begin to diffuse and evenly distribute throughout his body. If we express Mr. Frog as 16oz we can calculate that over time the new total solution index will become 3.333%. As for Mr. Frog he has been preserved to the efficacy of a 3.333% chemical with pressure applied by force of surrounding liquid and gravity.

To continue our experiment, lets fill another bucket with 128 ounces of water. Remove Mr. Frog from his dire situation and place him in our new bucket. He will not come back to life. Yet over time, preservative which has made its way into his tissue will leave. The index will again evenly distribute and diffuse from Mr. Frog into the fresh water diluting our index to 0.370%.

Now for our practical application of these concepts.  An Embalmer injects 3 gallons into a deceased person using 2 bottles of arterial at 30 index. He/she has distributed to every vessel in the body. If our embalmer mixes a new solution of 2 gallons using 1 bottle of arterial at 30 index, will the embalmer achieve greater preservation?

*First to post answer can redeem a magic store promo code*

**R.I.P. Mr. Frog**

→ Embalming and Pressure Video

Embalming and Pressure from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.


This video is called Pressure and Embalming
We are covering: Pressure measured in the embalming machine- Pressure measured within the vascular system-and more!


Thursday, November 29, 2018

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

→ Diffusion- Chemical Science & Embalming

To be up front, do NOT consider this to be the greatest source of information about chemistry.  In fact, failing in a chemistry class among students a couple years older than I was the beginning of my chemistry education.  Let this instead be the most practical explanation of "diffusion" and why it matters to embalmers.

Diffusion, at a basic understanding, can be described as a process where molecules are evenly dispersed over time. This transport will happen from an area of high concentration to low concentration. Gravity and edema is a fitting example any embalmer can understand. Consider gravity and its affect on water retained in the body. In this example we can expect fluid to be retained in the legs.  Logically the greatest volume or concentration of fluid would be at the lowest parts of the legs. If we would elevate the legs into the air, fluid would move from a high concentration area to a lower concentration area.  To be more specific, fluid would move from the legs towards the abdomen. In science we describe this process as diffusion.

There are many factors which can influence diffusion.  Understanding these factors assists the embalmer to apply the most effective techniques.  For instance, temperature is a way to influence diffusion.  It is also a reason many experts suggest using warm water within the fluid solution. On the micro level, molecules when cold move the slowest, while molecules hot move the fastest. The movement or lack there of aides and inhibits the transport of molecules which occurs during the diffusion process. This is part of the challenge which many embalmers face during extreme refrigerated cases.

Several other factors contribute to our complete understanding of diffusion. Permeability of cell walls can be drastically affected by polar ions such as calcium, chloride or salts.  Talking permeability, smaller molecules will have an easier time passing as compared to larger molecules. Also, thicker walls are harder to pass while thinner walls are easier to pass. Considering all of this, we wouldn't be able to pass anything without force.  We measure force as pressure. Pressure is a quantitative measurement of force which can be taken at any site or location. As in our example, legs elevated, we are using gravity to generate negative pressure in the low fluid concentration area ( abdomen ) and generate positive pressure in the high fluid concentration area ( legs ). Similarly under injection we are using the pump motor to force fluid and generate postive pressure against the vascular wall. As the pressure increases, the speed at which fluid ( high concentration ) diffuses into the low concentration areas ( the tissues ) increases.

Do you agree having covered temperature, pressure and permeability as it relates to diffusion benefits embalmers? In my opinion, the preservation of not only the deceased but also the art and science of embalming depends on it. Diffusion is what embalmers today count on to saturate and restore tissue for viewing purposes.

Monday, November 26, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: Low-High

Embalming Low Pressure High Flow from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.

This is the third installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
Low Pressure / High Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Sunday, November 25, 2018

→ Embalming Methodology- Old School

For our purposes we are calling this embalming technique, "Old School".  For those embalmers who know it, the name is out of respect for those still using it.  With respect for the the veterans of the profession, some young embalmers have learned why this old trick should never be forgotten.

The method is simple really, this is one of my personal favorites for apparent difficult cases (cases you'd expect to raise more than one vessel). Make a selection of an artery.  Be sure NOT to rupture any vessels in the process. If one should break, take care to use a locking forcep to restrict drainage. Incise the artery and insert a cannula, my preference is to utilize a Director Cannula to obtain access to the aorta.  This is helpful to reduce the possibility of post embalming swelling.

Estimate the deceased total body weight and take note.  Begin to inject without drainage the total body weight in ounces (you most likely will not need to inject the entire solution). For this method to work well, your pressure setting must be high (at least greater than 20) and it is wise to heavily restrict your rate of flow (trickle treat folks).  Take notice of the superficial vessels as an indication of fluid distribution.  Continue injection so long as swelling does not occur and until adequate firmness is achieved.  Massage during and after injection and apply warm water over the deceased (this accelerates the firming effects, heat provides ATP for the RXN).  Adequate and thorough aspiration following injection is very important as this will serve as the only means to remove blood from the body.

For best results consider handling these cases with a higher index solution or even waterless. For waterless cases, consider using the Pressure Pump Injector. This hand pump permits high pressure injection with ease-one bottle at a time-with trigger control.

This high pressure style embalming method we call "Old School" more than makes up for its distribution limitations with exceptional diffusion (high to low-low to high concentration). Embalming text supports heavily drainage being overated, we won't agree entirely.  We acknowledge the importance of drainage to achieve a lifelike appearance.  With that being said "Old School" remains as a tried and tested approach every embalmer can count on. 

Monday, November 19, 2018

→ The Director Cannula

The Director Cannula from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.

Direct while you Inject-


https://www.mortuarymagic.com/embalmer-resources/product-claims/injection

Embalm the arch of the aorta via the subclavian artery using one of these 16 inch cannula's-
Promote fluid flow to the legs-
Manipulate your injection site-

Order now →

Sunday, November 18, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: High-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
High Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

→ Waterless Embalming- Theory & Practical Application

Theory

Practical Applications Include: Decomposition / Edema / Trauma or Restoration Cases
Within the bounds of our topic, I must share the words of a great mentor who often said-
“ An embalmers ability is not well demonstrated or established with cases with little difficulty- it can be quantifiably measured by the progress made in times of trial and failure. ”
When or how might an embalmer make the determination to go waterless? The first step would be to judge not simply the case at hand, but also yourself. To be true and honest with the skills you possess is necessary to understand the limitations of your own capabilities. Second, how compromised is the case you are called to serve? A very clear indicator for me, as an embalmer, is the signs of marbling. Marbling is the apparent darkened discoloration of the superficial venous system. With this condition, one can reasonably expect the venous system in its decomposed state to have changed. Expect the expected- weaker vessel strength and decreased ability, or complete loss of the ability, to return blood or fluid (drainage).
Signs of decomposition should not be the only qualifier. For our purposes, we might also add cases of edema or restoration-that require rapid firmness. If we compare our most straightforward embalming cases with our more difficult cases, what can we learn? Would we agree that most straightforward cases required a lower chemical concentration and had significantly greater distribution to vessels as compared to the difficult cases. Having developed a case intuition or case analysis skill, the embalmer is provided the opportunity to adjust their method. Based upon the results presented- is it not reasonable to believe there might be a correlation between distribution and chemical concentration? If we accept these results and are honest with our limitations, we can grow. For as Jake Huard said, “To achieve we must believe”. If we continue to develop this belief, we might suggest that an increased chemical concentration can do well to compensate for poor distribution. When employed properly, results will show that this is true. Mastery of this skill requires a broad knowledge of the various difficult cases.
Edema is known to challenge even skilled embalmers. It is well known by expert embalmers, to adjust their fluid concentration to account for the added water. By estimating the volume of retained fluid- embalmers deduct this value from the water added to their fluid mixture. While the higher concentration of fluid enters the tissue- chemical concentration decreases. Though the concept is fairly straightforward, this is truly an art as much as a science.
In closing, trauma may be one of the greatest challenges an embalmer can face. Repairing tissue without first preservation could fail even the most skilled restorative artists. By experiencing the challenge of restoring poorly preserved tissue, restorative artists can learn to advantage their work with greater preservation.
-The Mortuary Scientist

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: Low-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
Low Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Saturday, November 10, 2018

→ Centrifugal Style Embalming Pumps

Centrifugal Style Embalming Pumps from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.

Need to fix your embalming machine?
Want to learn more about it?
Maybe you just want to be better at what you do.

This video is just for you- and yeah I know I say 'Centrifugal' wrong! I will correct it in my next video!

Friday, November 2, 2018

→ New Video Ad- Pressure Pump Injector



Originally designed to revolutionize gravity feed cavity treatment-what was discovered was much more.  Undiluted pre-injections, hypodermics, high pressure power that puts machines to shame and even water-less cases-the pressure pump injector changes the game.  Screw on a standard 16 oz fluid bottle and get to work.  Intended for use with Tygon Tubing- 3/8 ID , 5/8 OD, 1/8 Wall.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

→ Product Review & Testimonials

We hope you have been enjoying our products.
Your feedback is always appreciated.
Feel free to post your honest testimonial.

Please include product, some firm information and frequency of use.