Showing posts with label feed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label feed. Show all posts

Thursday, January 10, 2019

→ What You can Learn from Gravity Injection - Must Read


No this post is not about drinking games or parties, it is actually about embalming. However, it seems within the funeral industry the college kids and hardcore adults might know more about it than some embalmers do today. Can anyone guess what the pressure of the alcohol is in this video, or better yet what about the rate of flow?

If you were conducting yourself within the industry with a license and have not heard someone say, "rate of flow swells the body while embalming" that would surprise me. Sure, turning the rate of flow valve to much or too quickly can lead to swelling rather quickly. Performing this action does in fact increase the measurable flowing pressure, then the internal pressure, and the result is swelling.
In regards to swelling, consider this example. If the rate of flow is equal to the rate of drainage, how can there be swelling? Better question, what is the pressure? No we aren't going to talk shell embalming or that increasing drainage is not possible even though it is- Siphonbalm. Simple answer is there can't be and so it must not be true. After just a little consideration one cannot make the rate of flow swelling claim reasonably or intelligently. The constant in the swelling occurrence is the increase in internal pressure, which can be measured with our Frankembalm machine.

But was there even such a thing as rate of flow while embalmers were putting beer bongs, I mean funnels, in the air using gravity to inject? The answer is yes. There was a rate of flow as fluid would flow due to the force of gravity. This is still true. Without force, which we measure as pressure, you do not have flow. Said another way, pressure creates flow. It is that simple.  Consider how you or anyone would gravity inject. Mild elevation as you get started. With mild elevation you will expect and get a mild rate of flow. Fluid will take the path of least resistance and be unable to pass areas of greater resistance. The elevated height will determine what is a path of great resistance or least resistance. The speed of drainage will begin to remove pooled blood from the body, this will lessen the pressure demand to distribute fluid. As rate of drainage becomes steady, increase the elevation and the job is done. Tubing size is the same as with all embalming machines, cannula size is the same, typical elevation at ten feet high would create approximately five pounds of pressure- has this ever lead to severe swelling? Not that I have seen.

How can we use this knowledge to improve our present skills? Is there a benefit to high flowing embalming? High flow results in de-saturation of tissue. In addition to distribution benefits, Jaundice cases, edema cases or even standard cases can greatly benefit of high flow embalming. Flushing bilirubin out is key for achieving a well preserved "un-green" jaundice case. Drawing moisture into the vascular system for removal will improve preservation of edematous tissue. Finally, drawing any water from any case will delay decomposition.

To make you a bit more comfortable injecting with a 'high rate of flow' with centrifugal embalming machines, here is a quick how to which probably doesn't require you to buy anything.
Make two incisions, one at the right clavicle site other at the left bra strap site.
From the left bra strap site incise and insert forceps in the subclavian vein and left jugular vein. 
From the site at the right clavicle incise and insert forceps into the right jugular vein.
Inject south via the carotid artery with pressure setting below 1 lb.
Remember what we know about gravity feed, as fluid flows and returns drainage turn the 'rate of flow' by 1/5.
As drainage continues to increases, continue opening the valve until it is completely open.
From that point raise the pressure carefully until you have achieved the desired results, you will not be disappointed.  

Whats your pressure number?