Showing posts with label fluid. Show all posts
Showing posts with label fluid. Show all posts

Sunday, November 18, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: High-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
High Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: Low-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
Low Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

→ Abnormal Pressure Systems - Physical Science & Embalming

Much like a UFO, specific cases yield many questions unanswered for embalmers. Furthermore, what we are able to detect with our eyes often still limits us from gathering all the details we need to do the best job. It was once said that an embalmer’s greatest disappointment or regret is never having the ability to get the same person twice. Hopefully as we grow together, we are able to keep good enough records and data to still advance and improve our capabilities.
While performing case analysis, it is essential that the embalmer is attentive to potential fluid or air obstruction which will prevent fluid traveling throughout the vascular system. Air obstructions might be regarded as the highest priority for the embalmer’s attention. Permitting the complete escape of air is the optimal result, however, we often can fall short of this expectation. Persistent channeling to release air may be necessary as the embalming process progresses. Often, a trocar is used to permit the escape of gas; however, this can often lead to just an intermittent release of gas. Following up the initial escape of gas with forceps or scissors can make an easier path for gas to travel through, despite what other obstructions may be present.
If air remains within the path of travel, fluid by nature has a very difficult time overcoming this obstruction. As fluid travels upstream against gravity without any air present, its ability to travel well is significantly impacted. When air is present in the vessel between fluid, a circumstance known as vapor lock occurs. This is great cause for concern, as truly there is no way to overcome this distribution issue without force, otherwise known as pressure. To even better understand this, know that air has the ability to compress, making it more and more challenging for a fluid to try to overcome it. We have already explained the negatives of a high internal pressure of the arterial system, so now we have the present problem of how we overcome vapor lock without also sacrificing the appearance of the deceased. We will cover the methodology that has been proven to overcome the embalmer’s nightmare, but you will have to keep reading. For now just remember, if its air, it stinks, so do what you can and let it loose!
-The Mortuary Scientist

→ Intro - Physical Science Embalming

The chemistry of science as it relates to embalming has been long analyzed and interpreted by many. This article is to bring to light the science that has been less acknowledged by the embalming community. We refer to the science of Physics to explain the physical science of flowing fluids, specifically fluid dynamics.
Physical science in conjunction with the Chemical science is responsible for the embalming procedure, and knowledge of one without the other can ultimately lead to a failed operation and an unsatisfied client family. The Physical science of embalming accounts for how fluid is distributed within the vascular system, whereas the Chemical science accounts for the effect the fluid will have on the tissue. A good knowledge of both will lead the embalmer to a greater understanding of where and how to make adjustments to achieve positive results.
As a short example, please consider a known working solution for an edema case. The water has been retained within the legs of the deceased. The operator will use a waterless solution of a high index chemical, and consider salts as well. The operator will use a single point injection via carotid artery and drainage from the jugular vein. This Chemical approach to the problem can prove successful in reducing the tissue in the legs; however, it could cause massive dehydration to the upper extremities. So allow us to ask: is there a Physical approach to this problem which could yield greater results with less effort or room for error?
You might agree, after reading on, that there are many superior Physical approaches to this problem.
-The Mortuary Scientist