Showing posts with label low. Show all posts
Showing posts with label low. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

→ Diffusion- Chemical Science & Embalming

To be up front, do NOT consider this to be the greatest source of information about chemistry.  In fact, failing in a chemistry class among students a couple years older than I was the beginning of my chemistry education.  Let this instead be the most practical explanation of "diffusion" and why it matters to embalmers.

Diffusion, at a basic understanding, can be described as a process where molecules are evenly dispersed over time. This transport will happen from an area of high concentration to low concentration. Gravity and edema is a fitting example any embalmer can understand. Consider gravity and its affect on water retained in the body. In this example we can expect fluid to be retained in the legs.  Logically the greatest volume or concentration of fluid would be at the lowest parts of the legs. If we would elevate the legs into the air, fluid would move from a high concentration area to a lower concentration area.  To be more specific, fluid would move from the legs towards the abdomen. In science we describe this process as diffusion.

There are many factors which can influence diffusion.  Understanding these factors assists the embalmer to apply the most effective techniques.  For instance, temperature is a way to influence diffusion.  It is also a reason many experts suggest using warm water within the fluid solution. On the micro level, molecules when cold move the slowest, while molecules hot move the fastest. The movement or lack there of aides and inhibits the transport of molecules which occurs during the diffusion process. This is part of the challenge which many embalmers face during extreme refrigerated cases.

Several other factors contribute to our complete understanding of diffusion. Permeability of cell walls can be drastically affected by polar ions such as calcium, chloride or salts.  Talking permeability, smaller molecules will have an easier time passing as compared to larger molecules. Also, thicker walls are harder to pass while thinner walls are easier to pass. Considering all of this, we wouldn't be able to pass anything without force.  We measure force as pressure. Pressure is a quantitative measurement of force which can be taken at any site or location. As in our example, legs elevated, we are using gravity to generate negative pressure in the low fluid concentration area ( abdomen ) and generate positive pressure in the high fluid concentration area ( legs ). Similarly under injection we are using the pump motor to force fluid and generate postive pressure against the vascular wall. As the pressure increases, the speed at which fluid ( high concentration ) diffuses into the low concentration areas ( the tissues ) increases.

Do you agree having covered temperature, pressure and permeability as it relates to diffusion benefits embalmers? In my opinion, the preservation of not only the deceased but also the art and science of embalming depends on it. Diffusion is what embalmers today count on to saturate and restore tissue for viewing purposes.

Monday, November 26, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: Low-High

Embalming Low Pressure High Flow from Your Mortuary Magic Store on Vimeo.

This is the third installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
Low Pressure / High Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Sunday, November 25, 2018

→ Embalming Methodology- Old School

For our purposes we are calling this embalming technique, "Old School".  For those embalmers who know it, the name is out of respect for those still using it.  With respect for the the veterans of the profession, some young embalmers have learned why this old trick should never be forgotten.

The method is simple really, this is one of my personal favorites for apparent difficult cases (cases you'd expect to raise more than one vessel). Make a selection of an artery.  Be sure NOT to rupture any vessels in the process. If one should break, take care to use a locking forcep to restrict drainage. Incise the artery and insert a cannula, my preference is to utilize a Director Cannula to obtain access to the aorta.  This is helpful to reduce the possibility of post embalming swelling.

Estimate the deceased total body weight and take note.  Begin to inject without drainage the total body weight in ounces (you most likely will not need to inject the entire solution). For this method to work well, your pressure setting must be high (at least greater than 20) and it is wise to heavily restrict your rate of flow (trickle treat folks).  Take notice of the superficial vessels as an indication of fluid distribution.  Continue injection so long as swelling does not occur and until adequate firmness is achieved.  Massage during and after injection and apply warm water over the deceased (this accelerates the firming effects, heat provides ATP for the RXN).  Adequate and thorough aspiration following injection is very important as this will serve as the only means to remove blood from the body.

For best results consider handling these cases with a higher index solution or even waterless. For waterless cases, consider using the Pressure Pump Injector. This hand pump permits high pressure injection with ease-one bottle at a time-with trigger control.

This high pressure style embalming method we call "Old School" more than makes up for its distribution limitations with exceptional diffusion (high to low-low to high concentration). Embalming text supports heavily drainage being overated, we won't agree entirely.  We acknowledge the importance of drainage to achieve a lifelike appearance.  With that being said "Old School" remains as a tried and tested approach every embalmer can count on. 

Sunday, November 18, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: High-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
High Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

→ What to Inject while you're Injecting: Low-Low


This is the first installment of the 'What to Inject while you're Injecting Series'
Low Pressure / Low Flow settings
Do you already know what happens?

The series will cover embalming with the various settings of your 'Centrifugal' style embalming machine!